Animal Science

Job Opening: Extension Educator, Diversified Livestock

The College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources (CAHNR) at the University of Connecticut contributes to a sustainable future through scientific discovery, innovation, and community engagement. CAHNR’s accomplishments result in safe, sustainable and secure plant and animal production systems, healthier individuals and communities, greater protection and conservation of our environment and natural resources, balanced growth of the economy, and resilient local and global communities. We epitomize the role of a land-grant university, which is to develop knowledge and disseminate it through the three academic functions of teaching, research, and outreach. In so doing, we improve the lives of citizens of our state, region and country.

 

The Department of Extension is seeking applicants for a full-time,  non-tenure track Assistant/Associate Extension Educator, primarily based at the Windham County Extension Office in Brooklyn, CT (75% Extension), with teaching responsibilities (25%) at the UConn Storrs Campus.  Position level/rank will be commensurate with experience working with Extension and/or teaching livestock production.  Anticipated start date is July 2020.

 

This is a joint appointment between the Department of Extension and Department of Animal Science with administrative responsibility in the Department of Extension. The successful candidate is expected to establish an externally funded Extension program that meets critical needs and builds the knowledge base with multidisciplinary, collaborative opportunities in livestock production.  Livestock species shall include but are not limited to beef, sheep, swine, goats and poultry. Faculty member will assess clientele problems and needs for Extension programs, and is expected to partner with other disciplines, programs, agencies, organizations and groups. Integrated programs may address basic and/or applied issues relative to livestock production including but not limited to animal health and nutrition, food safety and nutrient management.  This position will extend the reach of UConn Extension by integrating distance learning technology into program delivery through computer applications, web pages, electronic mailings, multimedia, and emerging technologies. This will be accomplished by utilizing innovative approaches to deliver timely, evidence-based solutions for livestock-related issues to diverse clientele. 

 

The candidate will also teach one course per semester in the Department of Animal Science (e.g. Livestock Management and Livestock and Carcass Evaluation). The incumbent is expected to effectively support and work across Extension and Animal Science teams, especially in applied research in the candidate’s area of expertise.  The successful candidate is expected to work with other faculty members in a multidisciplinary team environment, develop a diverse portfolio of educational materials for Extension clients and scholarly materials for professional peers.   To fulfill the extension mission, the successful candidate will perform other appropriate duties as needed or assigned. 

 

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

  • An earned PhD in animal science or closely related field required.
  • Three years’ experience working with and teaching livestock production in Extension and/or informal classroom settings.
  • Candidates must have a significant and demonstrated experience in the field of livestock production.
  • Experience in scholarship and grantsmanship.
  • Candidates must possess strong skills in leadership, written and verbal communication, and interpersonal relations.
  • Personal transportation and a driver’s license are required; mileage allowance is provided for Extension related travel.Evening and weekend work may be required.

 

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS

  • Experience with Extension and the land-grant university system.
  • Demonstrated applied research interests associated with livestock production.
  • Demonstrated experience with enhancing diversity in educational program delivery and participation.

 

APPOINTMENT TERMS

This is a full-time position with generous benefits package. For more information on benefits, go to:  http://www.hr.uconn.edu/benefits/index.html. Starting salary for this position will be commensurate with training and experience.  This is an 11-month per year non-tenure track faculty position. 

 

TO APPLY

Select “Apply Now” to be redirected to Academic Jobs Online to complete your application.  Applicants should submit a letter of application that addresses qualifications identified in the advertisement, a resumewriting sample, and a list of three references with contact information. Please demonstrate through your application materials how you meet the minimum qualifications and any preferred qualifications for this position.

Please reference Search #2020237 in your application submittal.   Screening will begin immediately and will continue until a suitable candidate is found.  Preference will be given to candidates that apply within the first three weeks. 

Employment of the successful candidate will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment criminal background check. (Search # 2020237)

This position will be filled subject to budgetary approval.

All employees are subject to adherence to the State Code of Ethics, which may be found at http://www.ct.gov/ethics/site/default.asp.


The University of Connecticut is committed to building and supporting a multicultural and diverse community of students, faculty and staff. The diversity of students, faculty and staff continues to increase, as does the number of honors students, valedictorians and salutatorians who consistently make UConn their top choice. More than 100 research centers and institutes serve the University’s teaching, research, diversity, and outreach missions, leading to UConn’s ranking as one of the nation’s top research universities. UConn’s faculty and staff are the critical link to fostering and expanding our vibrant, multicultural and diverse University community. As an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity employer, UConn encourages applications from women, veterans, people with disabilities and members of traditionally underrepresented populations.

Full details and information on how to apply is available at: http://web2.uconn.edu/uconnjobs/faculty/schools_colleges/cahnr.php

Basic Management of Small Poultry Flocks

By Michael J. Darre, Ph.D., P.A.S.

rooster at UConn facility
White leghorn roosters with chickens at the Poultry Uniton Jan. 27, 2017. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

There are several basic needs that need to be provided for poultry. These are feed, water, fresh air, light, darkness, proper thermal environment, protection (from the elements, predators, injury and theft) and proper space. Proper housing and equipment will take care of many of these items. Poultry and other animals function normally when they exist in harmonious balance with the other living forms and the physical and chemical factors in their environment. Therefore, it is the role of the poultry owner to properly manage the animals in their care.

HOUSING

Poultry require a dry, draft free environment. Depending upon the number of birds to be housed, almost any type of building that provides controlled ventilation, such as windows and doors, can be used. Birds should be reared in high, well drained areas. The windows of the coop and, outside run should face south to allow maximum exposure to the sun throughout the year. This helps with warmth in the winter and dryness during the rest of the year.

If you are building new, consider a concrete floor and starting your walls with two concrete blocks. This will prevent rodents, snakes and other predators from digging under the walls and floors for entrance into the coop. If you use plywood for floor construction, consider using two layers of 3/4″ CDX plywood, with a layer of 1/4″ or 1/8″ galvanized wire mesh between the layers, then raise the floor off the ground with posts or 6″ x 6″ runners. Using runners allows you to move the coop as needed. Being off the ground also helps prevent rot and moisture in the coop. All this helps prevent predators from chewing through the floor. Some have found that using the double layer of plywood with wire mesh and insulation between the layers helps keep the coop warmer in the winter. Windows should also be covered with wire mesh to keep wild birds and other predators out. For summer, a wire mesh screen door helps keep the coop cooler at night.

Ventilation provides comfort for the birds by removing moisture, ammonia and other gases; provides an exchange of air and helps control the temperature of the pen. You can use natural or gravity fed ventilation with windows, flues and slats. Or you can use forced air ventilation if you have a larger number of birds. In a small coop (less than 150 sq ft of floor space) you can use a bathroom fan in the ceiling and slats in the walls or windows to remove excess moisture in the winter, much as it does in your home. It is important to remove excess moisture and ammonia from the coop, especially in cold weather when ventilation is at a minimum.

For predator protection, keep your birds confined with fence and covered runs. Outside run fencing should be buried at least 12″ to 18″with an 6″ to 8″ “L” or “J” to the outside, backfilled with rocks and soil to prevent digging predators. To prevent problems with flying predators, cover your outside runs with mesh wire or netting. A 3-4 ft. grid over the pen made from bailing twine has also proven effective against flying predators. A good outside run can be made by digging 12-18” with a slight slopeaway from the coop, and laying plastic sheetingdown (if you don’t have good drainage) with a drain pipe at the end to catch runoff. Add 4-6” of sand, cover with 1⁄4” wire mesh, add 4-6” of coarse gavel, cover with 1/4” wire mesh and topwith 4-6” of pea-gravel. Put a barrier around therun of 2×6” to keep the gravel in place. Or youcan use a good ground cover of millet, broomcorn, sorghum or other tall leafy vegetation which provides hiding space for the birds.

Space:

Birds need adequate space for feeding, exercise, breeding, nesting and roosting.

Minimum Space Requirements

poultry space requirements by type of bird

Roosts: Provide chickens with 6-10 inches of roost space per bird. Round roosts are the best, and a tree branch of about 1″ to 1.5″ in diameter works well. Meat birds and waterfowl do not require roosts.

Nests: It is best to provide one nest box for each 4-5 females in the flock. 12-14” cubeswith front open with perching space for the birds to stand on while entering the nest.

Floor material: Litter floors of wood shavings is the best. Wood has an excellent capacity to absorb moisture and then re- release it into the air. Whatever you use, keep it clean and dry.

FEED AND WATER

Birds need free access to fresh feed. Feeders can be made of wood, metal, or plastic, but it is important to provide about 2-3 linear inches of feeder space per bird and up to 6″ for meat type birds and turkeys. They should be adjustable in height so the lip of the feeder will be at the level of the back of the bird when standing. Keep troughs only half full to prevent feed wastage.

Fresh water should always be available to your birds, inside or outside. If using an open waterer keeping the lip of the waterer level with the back of the bird is essential. For winter watering, metal waterers can be placed on low temp heaters, keeping the

water at about 50oF. However, nipple waters are the best, since the birds cannot produce suction in their mouth. I recommend them over any open watering system. Use of a fish tank heater in buckets used for nipple waterers helps prevent freezing in the winter.

Commercial poultry feeds have been specially formulated for the type and age of your birds and are the best source of nutrition for your birds. For egg layers, a 14 or 16% CP laying mash or crumbles can be fed from the first egg until out of production. Chicks should be fed a 18-23% CP medicated starter, unless they received cocci-vac, then use a non-medicated starter feed, for six weeks. Then put on a 16-18% CP layer grower feed till 15 weeks or first egg, then on to the layer feed. Broilers should be feed a broiler starter (21-23% CP) feed for 3 weeks, and a 18-20% CP grower/ finisher till market.

LIGHT

Poultry require artificial lighting to maintain egg production during the short days of winter. Poultry are long-day breeders and we normally provide laying hens about 16 hrs of light per day throughout the year. Light timers set to come on at 5 am and off at 9 pm will supply the hours required. Low wattage CFL, LED or Incandescent lamps that supply about 1 foot candle of light at bird level is adequate. Use a 2700K lamp.

Never decrease the hours of light on laying hens or increase the hours of light on a growing bird.

BROODING

Raising and brooding baby chicks requires special care. Chicks need to be reared in isolation for disease prevention. They should be reared in a clean, disinfected environment. Baby chicks cannot properly regulate their body temperature for a few days after hatching and require a heat source. Heat lamps, brooder stoves, hovers and infrared heaters work well. A brooder guard, a ring of cardboard or plastic at least 18″ high on the floor circling the heat source keeps the chicks from getting too far from the heat and reduces drafts. Watch the birds, if they huddle under the heat source, they are too cool, if off to one side, a draft, if spread evenly, just right. For newly hatched birds is it best to provide them with water for the first couple of hours before giving them solid feed. This helps clean out their excretory system. If you get chicks from a distant hatchery through the mail, then give them a 5% sugar water solution for the first few hours to boost their energy level.

DISEASE MANAGEMENT

Refer to UConn Poultry Pages for more detailed information on health and diseases of poultry.

Download a copy of this article as a PDF.

Connecticut Dairy Seminar

dairy seminarRegister Today for the March 13th
New England Dairy Conference

Maximize your milk yield returns by understanding the role of fatty acids in dairy cattle nutrition.  Maximize profits from your forages.  Two timely topics; three excellent speakers!
Based on research conducted over the past two years, conference speakers will tell you what you should do – nutrition and management – to boost de novo fatty acids and herd profit.  You can learn the tools to put these new milk metrics to work.
Here’s the details:
   

Connecticut Dairy Seminar
9:00 am – 3:15 pm
Monday, March 13, 2017
Holiday Inn Springfield South
1 Bright Meadow Blvd
Enfield, CT 06082

Topics and Speakers:
New Milk Analysis Technologies to Improve
Dairy Cattle Performance
 – Dr. David Barbano

Harvest for Profit – Tom Kilcer

Use of Milk Fatty Acid Metrics to Make
Nutrition and Management
Decisions
 
– Dr. Heather Dann

Click Here for Full Agenda

 

Click Here for Printable Registration Brochure

 

Click Here for Online Registration
 
Walkins will be welcomed!

Register online.

New England Dairy Conference Scheduled

dairy barn
Mary Margaret Cole at the Kellogg Dairy Barn on Jan. 16, 2014. (Peter Morenus/UConn Photo)

Join us for the New England Dairy Conference on March 13th:

 

CONFERENCE AGENDA

9:00 am – Registration, Refreshments and Trade Show

9:50 am -Welcome

Dr. Sheila Andrew, Professor, UConn, Department of Animal Science

10:00 am – “New Milk Analysis Technologies to Improve Dairy Cattle Performance’”

Dr. David Barbano, Professor, Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

11:00 am – “Use of Milk Fatty Acid Metrics to Make Nutrition and Management Decisions”

Dr. Heather Dann, Research Scientist, W.H. Miner

Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, NY

12:00 noon “Risk Management Program Updates”

Mr. Joe Bonelli, Associate Extension Educator, UConn Extension

12:15 pm – Introduction of Trade Show Participants

12:30 pm – Lunch and Trade Show

1:45 pm – “Harvest for Profit”

Mr. Tom Kilcer, CCA, Advanced Ag Systems, LLC

3:15 pm – Adjourn

 

FEATURED SPEAKERS

Dr. Heather Dann is a research scientist at the William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute in Chazy, NY. She grew up on a dairy farm in New York where she developed a passion for dairy and an appreciation for research. She received a B.S. degree from Cornell University, a M.S. degree from the Pennsylvania State University, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois. For the past 12 years, her research at the Miner Institute has focused on dairy cow nutrition and management. In particular, she has investigated different types of diets for transition cows to help control feed costs and minimize environmental concerns while promoting animal health and productivity.

Tom Kilcer grew up on a dairy farm in Columbia County, New York. After receiving a B.S. degree in Fisheries Science from Cornell University, he worked on environmental impact studies for Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station and Indian Point Energy Center. In 1976, he obtained a second B.S. degree in Agronomy from Iowa State University. For 33 years, he was the multi-county Field Crop and Soils Educator and Program Leader at Cornell Cooperative Extension of Rensselaer County, Troy, New York. In 2009, Tom moved to private consulting, with focus on research and education in close cooperation with university and extension specialists. Much of Tom’s effort is to develop crops, rotations, and harvest systems to support high forage dairy diets that enable farms to compete nationally and globally. His innovative work includes wide swath haylage, red clover same day haylage, winter forage production and management, sorghum production and harvest for dairy cows.

 

Dr. David Barbano is a professor in the Department of Food Science at Cornell University. He received his B.S. degree in Biology/Food Science in 1970; his M.S. degree in Food Science in 1973; and Ph.D. in Food Science in 1976, all at Cornell University. He joined the Department of Food Science as an Assistant Professor in 1980. In 1988, he became Director of the Northeast Dairy Foods Research Center. He is a member of ADSA, IFT, IDFA, AOACI, IAMFES, IDF, and NYS Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians. He is past president of the American Dairy Science Association (ADSA), a fellow of ADSA and the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. He received the Harvey Wiley Award of AOAC in 2010. He is on numerous International Dairy Federation committees for milk analysis.

DIRECTIONS

From Hartford, CT and points South: Take I-91 North. Take Exit 49 to merge onto US-5 N. Use the right lane to merge onto US-5 N. Turn right onto Bright Meadow Boulevard. From Springfield, MA and points North: Take I-91 South. Take Exit 49 for US-5/Enfield Street. Turn left onto US-5 N/ Enfield Street. Turn right onto Bright Meadow Boulevard.

An Equal Opportunity Employer and Program Provider

Issued by the Connecticut Cooperative Extension System, University of Connecticut, Storrs, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, Acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914. The university is committed to offering reasonable accommodations to persons who have challenges accessing University services and facilities because of a disability. Please ask for reasonable accommodations by contacting the office 14 days prior to the activity.