Connecticut Sea Grant

Support for the Aquaculture Industry

Marc Harrell
Marc Harrell, manager of Mystic Oysters, checks on brood stock at the Noank Shellfish Cooperative on Thursday. Although most of the co-op is shut down, the brood stock tanks had to be maintained. “This is our future, so we have to keep this going,” Harrell said. Judy Benson / Connecticut Sea Grant

Sales revenue for Connecticut aquaculture producers fell an average of 93 percent in February and March compared to the same period in 2019, and 70 percent of the workforce employed in shellfish, seaweed and finfish farming operations have been laid off due to impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

These are some of the findings of a preliminary summary of a survey of Connecticut’s aquaculture producers. It was conducted by Connecticut Sea Grant, UConn Extension and the Connecticut Department of Agriculture to assess impacts of the pandemic on the industry and inform assistance plans. Sea Grant, the Department of Agriculture and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are using the list of specific actions recommended by the respondents to design the most effective means of providing short- and long-term assistance, including grants and loans.

Read more.

Take a Fun, Educational Beach Walk and Share Your Finds

scallop shells on a Connecticut beachBeachcombing along the Connecticut coast can be a fun and healthy educational activity for families eager to get out outdoors while the COVID-19 virus keeps children home from school.
 
Among the many publications available from its website, Connecticut Sea Grant is calling attention to Living Treasures: The Plants and Animals of Long Island Sound, and a series of three pamphlets about seaweeds, shells and beach plants that families can use for easy beach activities. Families are urged to send photos from their outings that will be posted on the Connecticut Sea Grant website.
 

Aquaculture Farmers: Local Health Dept. & District Contact Info

Connecticut state flagIf you are considering direct sales via farm stands or markets, we previously sent the guidance and it is also at:http://aquaculture.uconn.edu. An important step in the approval process is to contact your local health department or district. Contact information is below. Keep in mind that these folks are very busy right now. Be persistent; be kind.

Sincerely, The Sea Grant Staff

If your health department/district is not listed (this list was created for aquaculture) visit https://portal.ct.gov/dph/Local-Health-Admin/LHA/Local-Health-Administration—Site-Map for the full list.

Local Health Department and District Contact Information

Ledge Light Health District – Serving Stonington, Groton, Ledyard, New London, Waterford, East Lyme, Old Lyme

(860)448-4882
Email:smansfield@llhd.org

https://llhd.org/about-us/staff/

East Shore Health District – Serving Branford, East Haven, or North Branford

203-481-4233

Email:info@esdhd.org

https://www.esdhd.org

Bridgeport Health Department

(203) 576-7680

Email:Albertina.Baptista@Bridgeportct.gov

http://bridgeportct.gov/health

Fairfield Health Department

(203) 256-3020

Email:scleary@fairfieldct.org

http://fairfieldct.org/health

Greenwich Health Department

(203) 622-7836

Email:cbaisley@greenwichct.org

http://www.greenwichct.org/HealthDept/HealthDept.asp

Guilford Health Department

(203) 453-8118

Email:johnsond@ci.guilford.ct.us

http://www.ci.guilford.ct.us/departments/health-department/

Madison Health Department

(203) 245-5681

Email:josepht@madisonct.org

http://www.madisonct.org/200/Health-Department

Milford Health Department

(203) 783-3285

Email:djoseph@milfordct.gov

http://www.ci.milford.ct.us/health-department-0

New Haven Health Department

(203) 946-6999

Email:mbond@newhavenct.gov

http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/Health/

Norwalk Health Department

(203) 854-7776

Email:ddamore@norwalkct.org

http://www.norwalkct.org/676/Health

Stamford Health Department

(203) 977-4399

Email:jcalder@stamfordct.gov

http://www.stamfordct.gov/health-and-social-services

Stratford Health Department

(203) 385-4090

Email:aboissevain@townofstratford.com

http://www.townofstratford.com/content/39832/39846/39915/default.aspx

Town of Darien

(203) 656-7320

Email:dknauf@darienct.gov

http://www.darienct.gov/content/28025/28541/default.aspx

West Haven Health Department

(203) 937-3660

Email:mlillis@westhaven-ct.gov

http://www.cityofwesthaven.com/164/Health-Department

Westport Weston Health District

(203) 227-9571

Email:mcooper@wwhd.org

http://www.wwhd.org

If your health department/district is not listed (this list was created for aquaculture) visit https://portal.ct.gov/dph/Local-Health-Admin/LHA/Local-Health-Administration—Site-Map for the full list.

Managing Stress – You and Your Families

stress spelled out with scrabble piecesIn this challenging time, we need to take care of each other and especially ourselves. Self-care is important to our physical and mental health. We all deserve self-care, especially now. Please consider these resources.

The first is a video on managing stress during a pandemic. It was worth the 17 minutes to hear tips on how to care for ourselves and our children. Maybe you are guiding co-workers or elderly parents. We hope this helps:

https://mediasite.video.ufl.edu/Mediasite/Play/bf0a42f96e874778bf47a8517125f1591d

Related Reading Resources: 

English:

How to Cope with Stress https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/sma14-4894.pdf

Talking to Your Children https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/pep20-01-01-006_508_0.pdf

Español:

Cómo lidiar con el estrés https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/sma14-4885spanish.pdf

Cómo hablar con los niños https://store.samhsa.gov/system/files/sma14-4886spanish.pdf

Other Mental Health Resources:

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has a list of five things you should know about stress and you can find that valuable information here:https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/stress/index.shtml.

Additionally, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and the Crisis Text Line have trained counselors who are ready to listen.  If you would like to talk to someone related to COVID-19, call the National Suicide Prevention Line: 1-800-273-8255, or text the word SHARE to 741741.  Website links can be found here: https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org | https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org

Please take care of yourselves and remember that we are here to help.

Sincerely,

The Connecticut Sea Grant staff

Important Resources for Aquaculture Farmers

shellfish
Photo: Tessa Getchis

March 19, 2020

COVID AND SEAFOOD SAFETY – By the National Fisheries Institute, includes responses to specific questions, as well as four simple talking points. 

REGULATORY INFO FOR DIRECT SALES
Get the information you need to make direct sales in your community.

NEED HELP GETTING WORD OUT VIA SOCIAL MEDIA?
Are you trying to make sales in your community during COVID-19, email Tessa.Getchis@uconn.edu.

 

March 17, 2020
SHELLFISH SAMPLING
Per the Connecticut DA/BA, shellfish sampling will continue along the coast so that harvest areas may remain open. Email David Carey or call (203) 874-0696 with any questions.

March 13,2020
US SMALL BUSINESS ASSOCIATION DISASTER ASSISTANCE
Call 1-800-659-2955 (TTY: 1-800-877-8339) or e-mail

CONNECTICUT COVID-19 PORTAL

US CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL 

US DEPT OF STATE TRAVEL ADVISORIES

FREE ONLINE TRAINING IN AQUACULTURE

Content curated by Tessa Getchis, UConn Extension & CT Sea Grant

New CTSG Undergraduate Research Fellowship Opportunity for Summer

Tom Martella
Tom Martella. Photo: Juliana Barrett.

NEW CTSG Undergraduate research fellowship opportunity for summer 2020

The Connecticut Sea Grant Undergraduate Research Fellowship seeks to broaden participation of underrepresented/underserved students in marine and coastal professions by providing early career experience, training and mentorship to the next generation of scientists, decision makers and marine industry professionals.

The program will do so by funding a research fellowship for up to two undergraduate students who represent the social diversity of the communities of Connecticut. Underrepresented minorities and socioeconomically disadvantaged students as well as students of color, indigenous students, members of the LGBTQ community and students with disabilities are encouraged to seek a research mentor with whom to apply for this opportunity.

Up to two fellowships, each with a $5,000 stipend, will be offered this summer to enable selected students to conduct independent research under the guidance of a research mentor. The application process requires submission of a mentor-proposed natural or social science-based research project and a student nomination for the research fellowship. The research project must be completed in nine weeks over the summer, and be focused on a coastal, marine or watershed issue relevant to the Connecticut Sea Grant Strategic Plan for 2018-2021, which can be accessed at: http://seagrant.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/1985/2017/04/CTSG-strategic-plan-2018-2021.pdf.

Submission deadline is Tuesday March 31, 2020

The complete Call and Guidance on how to apply can be found here.

Journey of A Climate Corps Student

Posted on January 24, 2020 by Juliana Barrett

By Sarah Schechter

Major Choices

I entered UConn as a Natural Resources Major, knowing I wanted to focus on the environment, but unsure of the exact path I wanted to follow. When choosing classes during my orientation session in Summer 2017, it was recommended that I take ANTH 1010: Global Climate Change and Human Societies, taught by Eleanor Ouimet. This was the class that helped me focus on what I wanted to continue doing here at UConn. We spent the class learning about anthropogenic climate change and how that was impacting the world. This became my passion and by the end of the semester, I had declared myself an Anthropology and Environmental Studies double major student.

 Climate Corps

When picking classes for sophomore year, EVST 3100 was brought to my attention as a major elective. This class is titled: Climate Resilience and Adaptation: Municipal Policy and Planning, also known as the Climate Corps. This class was co-taught by Juliana Barrett and Bruce Hyde, both of whom further increased my knowledge of climate change. Throughout the class, we took some time to look at the concepts, but focused more on applying them to real-world-based problems. One project in particular was called the “Cost of Sea Level Rise” and was an exercise in which each group was given a coastal location and the scenario of four feet of sea level rise. My group was assigned Miami Beach-Central and we decided to shift the entire population of the area to another section of Florida that would not be flooded in the same scenario. We created an entirely new layout using “Tempohousing”, which is a company that converts storage containers into stackable apartments. We also accounted for green initiatives such as solar panels, bike stations, and rooftop gardens. By having free reign with regard to our choices, we were able to formulate a radical solution and discuss concepts that we had never approached before. This allowed us to gain a better understanding of how to deal with these big issues and provided us with the opportunity to implement our own solutions. Throughout this class I learned the skills based on theoretical issues that I would later apply to actual scenarios.

Cost of Sea Level Rise Project

CRS

EVST 3100 came with the option of working on an independent study in the Spring 2018, and I decided that I wanted to continue developing the skills I learned in the class. I continued my work with Barrett and Hyde, working on a project with Diane Ifkovic. Ifkovic is the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) State Coordinator with CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP). I completed the independent study with her guidance about the Community Rating System (CRS). CRS allows towns to gain points for completing acts such as implementing stormwater management and having higher regulatory standards. Completing these actions gains points that then lead to lower flood insurance premiums for community members. Throughout this independent study I learned how to correspond with state officials and gather research for a real environmental project.

 Internship

After completing the independent study, I learned about an opportunity for an internship with UConn Extension and Connecticut Sea Grant. I applied and was chosen to work on the project with Juliana Barrett and Robert Ricard. I then spent the summer working on two major tasks. The first involved traveling to different locations around Connecticut and Rhode Island including: Davidson, Putnam, Stonington, Groton, and Westerly. I took pictures of flooding and areas that would be susceptible to flooding. I also visited historical societies and gathered images of historic flood events in Connecticut such as the “Flood of ‘55”. These photos were then put together in a photo bank for reference of flood conditions throughout the state. The second task was to create a video, similar to one from a Rhode Island series, about coastal and inland flooding in Connecticut. This assignment provided me with skills in communication with city officials and allowed me to interact with people from my field of interest. The video has been shown to many city officials and the governor of Connecticut; it has been well received. I was also able to attend a Sea Grant Conference and discuss my involvement with them, which was an amazing opportunity!

Sarah Schechter – Evacuation Route Sign in Stonington, CT

 

 Fall 2019

I went into Fall 2019 with the intention of working on a new video, but after talking with Barrett and Ricard, we were unsure of what the next film in the series would be. First, we were looking at making a video about legal aspects of resilience in Connecticut, but that proved to be more complicated than originally thought and has currently been put on the backburner. Instead I have been working on another video about Climate Change in Connecticut, which will be added to the series. Throughout the semester I have been creating an outline by looking at the Rhode Island version, researching climate change impacts in Connecticut, and sorting through a variety of sources. At this point I have a solid outline and will be able to move forward with the next film.

What’s Next?

In the Spring of 2020,

I plan to continue working with Barrett on the climate change script and finalize it by the end of the semester. I will then be able to create the climate change video during Summer 2020. This video will involve a similar process to that of the flooding video, as I will need to travel around Connecticut for pictures and to meet with city officials. I also plan to expand upon this project and base my thesis on my work with the Connecticut Sea Grant and UConn Extension. I am still in the planning process, but I know that I will be sending out a survey to city officials and community members to gather information regarding the content of the videos I’ve made. I will continue to develop this plan with Barrett over the course of the next semester.

 

Coastal Certificate Program

coastal certificate program flyer

Registration is now being accepted for this year’s Coastal Certificate Program, titled “Pathways from Source to Sea — How Gardens Can Make the Connection.” It will take place in March at Connecticut College in New London.

A series of four evening classes with a field trip, students will learn about coastal environmental issues, rethinking their lawns, creating native plant habitats and designing with nature and Long Island Sound in mind. Led by Judy Preston, Long Island Sound outreach coordinator for Connecticut Sea Grant, the program will feature multiple guest speakers giving presentations about how home gardens can help connect and restore vital pathways used by countless wildlife species, from the inlands to the Sound. Students do not have to be Master Gardeners to take the class.

Students of the program are encouraged to become ambassadors of alternatives to nutrient and chemically intensive landscaping practices for Connecticut coastal and watershed residents, through an outreach component designed to spread the word through projects, educational materials and other activities.

The classes will meet from 6 to 9 p.m. on March 9, 11, 23 and 25 in Room 101 of New London Hall at the college, 270 Mohegan Ave. The class is limited to 35 students.

The program is sponsored by Connecticut Sea Grant, the Long Island Sound Study, the UConn Master Gardener Program, the UConn College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources and the Connecticut College Arboretum. Now in its ninth year, the Coastal Certificate Program is the subject of an article titled “Gardening for the bees, butterflies and birds” is featured in the Fall-Winter 2019-20 issue of Wrack Lines magazine. The article can be found here.

Registration is available by visiting: https://mastergardener.uconn.edu and going to the Garden Master Course Catalog.

Registration is also available by visiting: https://uconnmastergardeners.gosignmeup.com/Public/Course/Browse

A pdf of the course flyer can be downloaded here.

For information, contact: Paul Armond at: Paul.Armond@uconn.edu; or Judy Preston at: Judy.Preston@uconn.edu or at: (860) 395-0465.

Art Exhibit at Avery Point Opening Soon

Among the Tides art exhibit flyer“Among the Tides,” a new exhibit featuring the work of photographer Elizabeth Ellenwood, will be on display at the Alexey von Schlippe Gallery at the University of Connecticut’s Avery Point Campus from Jan. 23 through March 15, with an opening reception Jan. 24.

The reception will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. at the gallery, located on the second floor of the Branford House at the Avery Point campus.

Ellenwood, recipient of a 2019 Connecticut Sea Grant Arts Support award, uses historic and modern techniques to transform plastic beach trash and microplastics into images that call attention to global ocean pollution. She uses the cyanotype process developed in the mid-1800s to create photographic prints without using a camera of discarded plastic items such as balloons, take-out cups, sandwich bags and lighters. The images, on chemically treated blue paper exposed to the sun, are then transferred in a second step using the wet plate collodion process onto colored glass.

Read more…

CT Sea Grant: Re-Thinking Relationships with the Places We Love

Wrack Lines cover

The Fall-Winter 2019-20 issue of Wrack Lines, a publication of Connecticut Sea Grant is now posted at:

https://seagrant.uconn.edu/?p=5770. In this issue we’re re-thinking relationships with the places we love.