IPM

Extension Educator Honored

Boucher Receives 2015 AAUP Service Excellence Award

Boucher
Jude Boucher on a Connecticut vegetable farm.

It was recently announced that Jude Boucher will be receiving the Service Excellence Award from the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) on April 6th at a ceremony in the Old Appropriations room of the State Capitol building in Hartford.

Jude is the Extension Educator for vegetable crops integrated pest management (IPM). His objectives are to provide Connecticut and New England vegetable growers with cutting-edge solutions to their pest management and crop production problems to keep them competitive on the local, regional and national level. IPM is a sustainable approach to managing pests, including insects, weeds, and diseases. IPM practitioners base decisions on information that is collected systematically as they integrate economic, environmental and societal goals. This flexible program can accommodate the changing goals of agriculture, commerce, and society by using biological controls, cultural control, mechanical control, chemical control and others.

Through his sustainable agriculture work with vegetable growers, Jude keeps Connecticut producers current on the most innovative agricultural technology to ensure farm profitability and economic viability of the industry. The positive benefit of his work extends beyond the farm, to the families, products, consumers and the environment.

Jude’s professional service to the agriculture industry, outreach efforts on behalf of UConn Extension and leadership in the department have been exemplary. His contributions have led to program excellence in vegetable production throughout the region. Through his work, vegetable producers have developed more sustainable and environmentally friendly practices that will enhance their economic viability for generations. To many Connecticut residents, Jude is the face of UConn. Congratulations Jude for receiving the 2015 AAUP Service Excellence Award.

 

Growing Container-Grown Greenhouse Vegetables

small green tomatoUConn Extension is sponsoring, Growing Container-Grown Greenhouse Vegetables  on Dec 16, 2014 at the  Litchfield County Extension Center, 843 University Drive, Torrington, CT.  

 

The speakers featured at this educational program include:

 

9:00-9:30         Registration

9:30 – 10:30     Growing Greenhouse Tomatoes and Cucumbers in Soiless Media

                                Richard McAvoy, Professor of Horticulture, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

 

10:30 – 10:45   Break

 

10:45–11:45     Growing Bench Top Salad Greens

                                Brian Krug, Extension Specialist, Greenhouse & Floriculture, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH

 

11:45-12:45       Diseases of Greenhouse Vegetables

                               Yonghao Li, Plant Pathologist, CT Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT

 

12:45-1:30        Lunch

 

 1:30–2:30       How Connecticut Grown Labeling Catches Customer Attention & Impacts Decision Making

                              Ben Campbell, Assistant Professor and Extension Economist, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT

2:30–3:00      Food Safety for Greenhouse Vegetables

                             Diane Wright Hirsch, MPH, RD, UConn Extension Educator, University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension, New Haven, CT

 

3:00 – 4:00    Grower To Grower Panel

                            Ben March, March Farms, Bethlehem, CT and Bruce Gresczyk Jr., Gresczyk Farms, New Hartford, CT

 

4.75 Pesticide Recertification Credits have been approved for private applicators

A registration fee of $25 is due by December 8th payable by check only to the University of Connecticut.   Included in the cost of admission:  coffee, lunch and informational handouts.

4.75 pesticide recertification credits will be offered for attendees in CT, RI, MA, ME, NH, and VT.

For more information contact:  Leanne Pundt at leanne.pundt@uconn.edu or call 860-626-6855 or visit the website: http://ipm.uconn.edu   or Click here for the registration form.

 

Invasive Pest Month

April is Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month when USDA/APHIS highlights how invasive species affect the economy, the environment and human health. Visit Hungry Pests, available in English and Spanish, to learn more.

EmeraldAshBorer1 An Emerald Ash Borer

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) today proclaimed April as “Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month.” All month, APHIS will highlight how invasive species can enter the United States and spread, and how the general public can take simple, specific actions to leave these hungry pests behind. Invasive pests and diseases are non-native species that cause – or are likely to cause – harm to the economy, the environment or human health.

“At its core, APHIS’ mission is protecting animal and plant health in the United States,” said Acting APHIS Administrator Kevin Shea. “This includes programs to address the invasive pests and diseases that have cost the United States billions of dollars in lost agricultural jobs, closed export markets and damaged ecosystems. It’s a huge job, and APHIS needs the help of the public to be successful.”

Devastating invasive pests and diseases – insects, disease-causing microorganisms, snails, slugs, mites, microscopic worms, weed seeds and fungal spores – often hitch rides on things people move and pack. These common pathways include passenger baggage; plants and plant parts like fruit, vegetables and bud wood; Internet-purchased plants and plant products; firewood; and outdoor gear, among many others. Fortunately, once people are aware of these risks, they can easily prevent the spread of hungry pests.

Visit the Hungry Pests website, which is available in English and Spanish, at www.HungryPests.com to view an interactive map and learn about invasive pests and diseases that are affecting or could affect individual states, and how to report them. The website’s “What You Can Do” section offers the public “Seven Ways to Leave Hungry Pests Behind.” Also, by using Facebook and Twitter links, visitors can engage on the invasive pest issue on social media.

APHIS safeguards U.S. agricultural and natural resources from risks associated with the entry, establishment or spread of agricultural pests and diseases, as well as invasive and harmful weeds. In this battle, the agency works very closely with its many partners at the federal, state, county and local levels, and at universities and nongovernmental organizations. APHIS has had many successes combatting invasive plant pests and diseases, including the eradication of the Asian longhorned beetle in Illinois, New Jersey and Islip, New York; numerous exotic fruit fly outbreaks in Florida, Texas and California; the wheat disease Karnal bunt in Texas and California; plum pox virus in Pennsylvania and Michigan; the boll weevil from all 17 cotton-producing states with the exception of Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley; and Khapra beetle infestations in a number of states. APHIS is also closing in on the eradication of the European grapevine moth in California.

With Agriculture Secretary Vilsack’s leadership, APHIS works tirelessly to create and sustain opportunities for America’s farmers, ranchers and producers. Each day, APHIS promotes U.S. agricultural health, regulates genetically engineered organisms, administers the Animal Welfare Act, and carries out wildlife damage management activities, all to help safeguard the nation’s agriculture, fishing and forestry industries. In the event that a pest or disease of concern is detected, APHIS implements emergency protocols and partners with affected states and other countries to quickly manage or eradicate the outbreak. To promote the health of U.S. agriculture in the international trade arena, APHIS develops and advances science-based standards with trading partners to ensure America’s agricultural exports, valued at more than $137 billion annually, are protected from unjustified restrictions.